Saturday, Nov 18th

Last update05:08:37 PM GMT

MODERN SLAVERY WHAT IS SLAVERY TODAY AND HOW ARE WOMEN AFFECTED ?

  Come and find out.

Join us on Monday 29th February 2016

6pm for refreshments and 6.30 for the meeting, at

Exeter College Sports Hall,  Hele Road

Exeter  EX4 4JS.  ( Map)

Find out what is happening in this country and the south west to stop this appalling breach of human rights and  

  • who are the victims of modern slavery and who is supporting them
  •  what the police are doing to prevent, investigate and prosecute modern slavery.
  •  what active citizens can do and how to be alert to the signs of modern slavery
  • what local anti slavery groups are doing 

6pm exhibition stall tea and coffee food

 Exhibitors

  • Fawcett Devon
  • Unchosen
  • Unseen
  • Local slavery campaign Groups
  • Anti slavery International 
  • Soroptimists

Fawcett Society 150 years celebration  exhibition stall and merchandise

Agenda

6.30       Welcome and Opening of the event

16.45     Panel discussion with questions from the Chaired by Yvonne Atkinson of Fawcett Devon.

7.10       Jane Jones : Unchosen short films  

7.20       Kate Garbers: Unseen's victim support work

7.30       Chief Constable of Devon and Cornwall and Isled of Scilly Shaun Sawyer

7.50       Alexis Wright to talk about the work of the Red Cross and how modern slavery affects women.

8.05       Speaker  to talk aboput business responsibility and transparency in the supply chain- what must business do and what can consumers do to stamp oput slavery

8.20       Group and Panel Discussion on what needs to happen and what actions we need to take to address this issue

8.30       Close

Find out More About us  and these 2 events and buy Fabulous and Feminist Presents here too

We will be selling  Fawcett Society's new range of merchandise such as its new Fabulous and Feminist mugs teashirts teatowels . 

Fabulous-and-Feminist-t-shirts-578x310

                                       You can also buy on line. Click to  go to Fawcett Shop

Join us on Friday 26h November at Reclaim the Night

 Reclaim  the Night

 

Join our November meeting which will take place behind the Fawcett Devon Banner as we march with  other women’s groups and supporters  on

 Reclaim the Night on

26th November   6.30 pm

 The Mint Methodist Church Centre

Mint Methodist Church, Fore Street, EX4 3AT Exeter, Devon

Wants some more Fun?

Join us for our seasonal social on Friday 4th December

MODERN SLAVERY EVENT

Find out what slavery means todasy especially for women 

Join our Event 29th February at Exeter College 6-8.30 pm

Hear the Chief Constable of Devon and Cornwall who leads the UK police  on tackling Modern Slavery  and other speakers

Visit our website and subscribe to our newsletter to find out more about our events  : from  www.fawcettdevon.org.uk or follow us on

 

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Join Fawcett Devon and make a difference to women in Devon

 Contact: coordinator@fawcettdevon.org.uk

Tel: 07883064237

The Fawcett Society has been going since 1866 it is now not only the longest surviving feminist organisation it’s the only one recognised by government to speak on behalf of women

Helping to bring about a society where the gender you are does not limit the life chances you have  Fawcett Devon is a branch of The Fawcett Society Linton House, Unit 204, 164-180 Union Street, London SE1 0LH Tel: 0203 598 6154  www.fawcettsociety.org.uk The Fawcett Society is a registered charity (no.1108769) and a limitedcompany registered in England and Wales (no. 04600514) with a registered office at Linton House, Unit 204, 164-180, Union Street, London SE1 0LH

 

CELEBRATING 150 YEARS OF CAMPAIGNING FOR WOMENS' EQUALITY

 

AGM Flyer 3

 AGM Flyer

 

Thank you for joining us at

Header-logo-300x138

 mixed small

 

Come to our social event 4th July

Social 


 Visit our website and subscribe to our newsletter to find out more about our events  : from  www.fawcettdevon.org.ukor follow us on

 

facebook-logosocial twitter box white 64

 

Join Fawcett Devon and make a difference to women in Devon

 

 Contact: coordinator@fawcettdevon.org.uk

 

Tel: 07883064237

 

The Fawcett Society has been going since 1866 it is now not only the longest surviving feminist organisation it’s the only one recognised by government to speak on behalf of women

 

Helping to bring about a society where the gender you are does not limit the life chances you have  Fawcett Devon is a branch of The Fawcett Society Linton House, Unit 204, 164-180 Union Street, London SE1 0LH Tel: 0203 598 6154  www.fawcettsociety.org.uk The Fawcett Society is a registered charity (no.1108769) and a limitedcompany registered in England and Wales (no. 04600514) with a registered office at Linton House, Unit 204, 164-180, Union Street, London SE1 0LH

CELEBRATING 150 YEARS OF CAMPAIGNING FOR WOMENS' EQUALITY

 

AGM Flyer 3

 AGM Flyer

 

Thank you for joining us at

Header-logo-300x138

 mixed small

 

Come to our social event 4th July

Social 


 Visit our website and subscribe to our newsletter to find out more about our events  : from  www.fawcettdevon.org.ukor follow us on

 

facebook-logosocial twitter box white 64

 

Join Fawcett Devon and make a difference to women in Devon

 

 Contact: coordinator@fawcettdevon.org.uk

 

Tel: 07883064237

 

The Fawcett Society has been going since 1866 it is now not only the longest surviving feminist organisation it’s the only one recognised by government to speak on behalf of women

 

Helping to bring about a society where the gender you are does not limit the life chances you have  Fawcett Devon is a branch of The Fawcett Society Linton House, Unit 204, 164-180 Union Street, London SE1 0LH Tel: 0203 598 6154  www.fawcettsociety.org.uk The Fawcett Society is a registered charity (no.1108769) and a limitedcompany registered in England and Wales (no. 04600514) with a registered office at Linton House, Unit 204, 164-180, Union Street, London SE1 0LH

Inequality in wealth due to uncrease under the Chancellor - this is a gender issue

David Blanchflower says : Inequality harms growth – but the Chancellor is going to deliver more of it - Independent 1st June
As women are poorer than men this is a gender issue...

The failure of economic forecasting continues to be a big problem, especially as we are about to be hit by another austerity Budget. Recall that forecast made by the Office for Budget Responsibility for the Budget of June 2010? The OBR forecast GDP growth averaging 2.8 per cent every year from 2011-2015; paying off of the deficit by 2015; wage growth of 4.4 per cent in 2014 and 2015. Plus exports were going to be making a major contribution to GDP growth in every year from 2011, and business investment was supposed to grow at double digits every year for years.

None of that happened, of course, and the UK lost its AAA credit rating and never got it back. Brilliant. I await with interest what the OBR forecast will be for the impact of Austerity Mark 2 (AM2) in the July Budget, and whether they learnt anything from their disastrous forecast when Austerity Mark 1 (AM1) was implemented. I doubt it.

 This week the ONS estimated that investment grew, not at double-digit pace, but at 3.7 per cent from Q1 2014 to Q1 2015, and net trade continued to subtract from growth. The UK trade balance widened from £9.6bn in Q4 2014 to £13.2bn in Q1 2015, with exports falling by 0.3 per cent on the quarter, while imports rose by 2.3 per cent. The UK’s negative trade balance is now twice the size it was in 2011. Great. 

Plus the second estimate of GDP that so many commentators just “knew” was going to be revised upwards wasn’t. Growth in Q1 2015 at 0.3 per cent was one third of the growth rate observed in Q1 2014, suggesting the economy has slowed sharply. In fact, services output was revised down. This included the Monetary Policy Committee, who in their most recent Inflation Report forecast that this quarter’s GDP would be revised up a lot. Plus almost all previous quarters going back through 2011. The MPC in their backcast have been saying that for ages and ages, with no sign of the data obeying their admonitions. The average revision to quarterly GDP over the last twenty years has been zero. And US GDP for Q1 2015 was revised down from plus 0.2 per cent to minus 0.7 per cent annualised on Friday. We just know all revisions are up.

The MPC has also been expecting a big take-off in private-sector wage settlements from the 2 per cent observed for the last couple of years, which of course hasn’t happened, and won’t. There has been no pick-up in wage settlements or wage growth. XpertHR reported that companies’ annual pay reviews are yielding a median pay award of 2 per cent, measured over the three months to the end of April 2015. The median pay award in both manufacturing and services was 2 per cent. This is the 13th month in a row they found that the median settlement was 2 per cent. XpertHR found that the middle half of pay awards were between 1.5 per cent and 2.4 per cent, with higher deals very rare: only 4.9 per cent of awards were above 3 per cent. Public-sector deals continue to lag, with the median at 1.6 per cent. Sheila Attwood, pay and benefits editor at XpertHR, commenting on the figures, argued that “employers continue to favour pay awards in the region of 2 per cent and we see no evidence of this changing over the remainder of the year”. The MPC once again seems to have lost the plot.

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We should be mindful when we evaluate George Osborne’s AM2 Budget the impact it has on inequality and poverty, in light of an important study published this week by the OECD, who are not known for being squashy feely, entitled “In It Together: Why Less Inequality Benefits All”. Today, in OECD countries, the richest 10 per cent of the population earn 9.6 times the income of the poorest 10 per cent. In the 1980s, this ratio stood at 7:1, rising to 8:1 in the 1990s, and 9:1 in the 2000s. This rise in income inequality the OECD reported “tends to drag down GDP growth”. The rise of income inequality between 1985 and 2005, the OECD estimates, knocked 4.7 percentage points off cumulative growth between 1990 and 2010. The OECD argued that the long-run increase in income inequality does not only raise social and political but also economic concerns: and it is the rising distance of the lower 40 per cent from the rest of society which accounts for this effect.

As background, the chart, which uses data from this OECD study, makes clear that inequality, as measured by the Gini coefficient, is especially high in the UK. The coefficient is the measure of income inequality where 1 represents all wealth in the hands of one person and 0 signals completely even distribution. It also shows that inequality in the UK rose under the Coalition between 2011 and 2013, which is the latest data available, although it should be said that inequality in the UK is still less than it was in 2007. But the trend is up and inequality in the UK is the highest of any European nation. 

Drawing on harmonised data covering the OECD countries over the past 30 years, the OECD explores whether income inequality has an impact on subsequent growth. The econometric analysis suggests that income inequality has a sizeable and statistically significant negative impact on growth. When income inequality rises, economic growth falls. The OECD also reports that redistribution through income taxes and cash benefits does not necessarily harm growth. It is inequality at the bottom of the income distribution that hampers growth. The OECD notes that “now top earners have a greater capacity to pay taxes than before, governments may consider re-examining their tax systems to ensure that wealthier individuals uphold their fair share of the tax burden”. Slasher won’t be pleased.

 The OECD concludes that its analysis points to the importance of carefully assessing the potential consequences of pro-growth policies on inequality. This is the important bit for George Osborne: “Focusing exclusively on growth and assuming that its benefits will automatically trickle down to the different segments of the population may undermine growth in the long run inasmuch as inequality actually increases. On the other hand it indicates that policies that help limiting or – ideally – reversing the long-run rise in inequality would not only make societies less unfair, but also richer.” My concern is that AM2 will do exactly the opposite, as AM1 did: the UK will likely become more unequal and poorer. Rising inequality is bad for growth. Austerity raises inequality and lowers growth. But the OBR will probably say the opposite.

Does Exeter Uni take sexual assaults on students seriously enough?

Reporting sexual assault at universities: share your stories

 
Fawcett Devon contacted Exeter University to ask what they did and got this response 

Further to our conversation via Twitter yesterday, please find below a statement from the University of Exeter:

 The welfare of every student is our highest priority and the University takes all allegations of this nature extremely seriously.

The University will not tolerate any form of harassment and is committed to ensuring that everyone on campus is able to work and study without fear of harassment or victimisation. We respond promptly and sensitively to complaints. Where complaints of such a nature are received the University would undertake a disciplinary investigation which could result in serious disciplinary sanctions, up to and including suspension or expulsion from the University.

The Students’ Guild is currently promoting a high-profile campaign, called Never Ok’, to educate people that unwelcome sexual advances are never acceptable. The video included actor David Tennant and Exeter MP Ben Bradshaw.

There are also very clear and well-publicised support systems in place for all students and we would encourage any student who encounters incidents of this nature to report them immediately. 

Members of the Residence Life team live in University owned, managed and approved residences and are on call to provide welfare support and guidance whenever required. Each student living in University accommodation is also assigned a Residence Life Mentor. The Residence Life Night Patrol also supports the University’s 24-hour Estate Patrol Security team by visiting residences.

The University provides Dignity and Respect Advisors who offer support for students and the University Wellbeing Service offers support and advice to  students who experience personal difficulties.

Charlotte Sweet
Social Media Manager

Communications & Marketing Services

Working Days: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday

 

01392 722061
www.exeter.ac.uk

Action Points from AGM 19th May 2015

ACTION POINTS FOLLOWING AGM

19TH MAY

PRESENT: Emma, Mandy, Catherine, Linda, Annie Yvonne Moira Liz Kate

1.Discussion about the year we have just had

1.1.Conference

Really good well organised conference. Attendees said it was fabulous and others said they were sorry they missed is. Great to have so many varied workshops which were really enjoyed and good speakers.

Conference good for Brand recognition – many not heard about us before and we got a lot of ‘respect’ from the conference. Numbers were not as many as hoped for. Learnt that if we are to be more effective we need to up our marketing and perhaps buy in specialist marketing skills.

Actions

1.1.1On 21st Yvonne is meeting with Leane Bramal who was part of a workshop to discuss if she could help with this

1.1.2 Should we consider a smaller event next year or something else?

 1.2 Issues surfaced during the year were:

  • We must be careful not to be seen to have any links with political parties though we can lobby them on gender issues
  • Should we have meetings around Devon as this dilutes attendance and prohibits continuity?
  • Are start times at 6.30 OK = broadly agreed yes
  • Is there conflict between feminist groups through miscommunication;. How can we work with Exeter Uni to assist feminist groups and  communicate with student feminist societies?
  • Can we build partnerships so we can work with other to achieve more?

Action

1.2.1 Everyone to bring a list of known groups businesses charities and agencies who are working to support or would be interested in supporting us to promote gender equality. This may help us identify groups to target for closer partnership working

2.Receive the annual financial statements

Action

2.1 Agreed to keep a reserve  

2.2 Grant funding

Preference will be given to fund:

  • IWD   8th March
  • Reclaim the Night End of November
  • Billion women rising Middle of February

2.3 Applications will be sought twice a year on a first come first served basis for grants for causes we have agreed to prioritise during the year

2.4 Details of how applications will be invited and agreed to be decided on advice of treasurer and it was suggested a grant sub group to be set up.

2.6 Agreed that FD  Budget for room hire and other expenses and other funds 

2.7       More discussion on this year’s strategic priorities will be discussed. The strategic priorities will be those agreed by the group are most important to promote gender equality in relevant campaign areas in Devon

2.8 It was agreed that before we make a final decision we should consult with women through facebook and website /newsletters on what these priorities might be – how to consult to be decided at the next meeting

3.Discussion about the year ahead and opportunities it presents

3.1 Areas of interest

Workshop on How to keep Safe in the Club scene at Night

 

3.1.1 Action

Linda and Moira to liaise to ensure that this is not being already done by a local Exeter group that was suggested by a radio interview

 

          Sex and relationship Education in Schools in Devon - what is happening?

3.1.2 Action

1.CatherineDiscuss with Devon Voice report on  what they are doing and/or is happening

2.Liz will discuss with the Plymouth Uni Institute of Education to find out what research is being done and what they understand is happening in Devon

3.Annie will contact Beat to ask what they are doing/understand is happening

          Wow

          3.1.3 Action

Moira to see if she can find out what WOW is planning next year to see if FD can have a role to play under the WOW umbrella

          Partnership working with Students in Plymouth Media Arts

3.1.4 Action

Annie to liaise with Liz Wells and go and speak to students to see if any would be interested in working with FD on an equality media arts project e.g. making films to be uploaded to You Tube. Can we use the Tedex research proposal model to make a proposal to them after this initial meeting?

4.Feedback on discussions with the Fawcett Society

Action

  • Agreed to  Chaire of fawcett invite Belinda  Phipps to meet up with us and discusspartnership at her next visit to Devon – Yvonne to action
  • Agreed we do not want to engage in fundraising

5.Volunteers to play the following roles for this next year

  • Co-oordinator,  Yvonne until September she will write a role  description  volunteer needed after that Annie will support
  • Treasurer;  Kate for the year she will write a role description to include treasurer’s role in  inviting and receiving grant applications and monitoring grants
  • Minute writer Annie
    • Equality Reference Group  Linda will continue as the representative shadowed by Mandy and will hand over to her when she is up to speed. Mandy will substitute in Linda absence while she is shadowing. Linda to sub for her when she takes over
  • Social Media focuses on twitter and facebook a group of 5 volunteers needed to make a difference Moira  and Annie to coordinate
  • Website Emma and Catherine to meet with Yvonne to discuss website and learn how to upload information and to refresh the design and consider improving the platform

Action

To be discussed at next meeting

 

7.Dates Venue and Programme for the Autumn

  • Next Meeting 9th June Exeter
  • September 2015 Jackie Longwith and  Ben Neild on Women’s pay  and opportunities for work in the south west and the gender gap Exeter 22 25th 29/30 September  Suggested dates
  • October/November   Ian Clewlow and Mandy.  The effect of changes in Probation and Criminal Justice System on Women Honiton date to be agreed?
  • October /November Modern Slavery Exeter? Date to be agreed
  • December Xmas Social? Exeter?
  • January  2016   to be decided but possibly What is the Inequality Women face in Health Service Provision is the NHS meeting women’s needs? Torquay?
  • May 2016 AGM Exeter

8.AOB

 

 

Bedroom tax discrimminates against women

A mother living in a domestic abuse ‘sanctuary scheme’ has lost her landmark challenge against the bedroom tax, in a blow to similar services across the country.

Claimant ‘A’ – whose identity is protected – lives in a property which has a special ‘panic space’ installed by the council.

The woman had her housing benefit deducted because the council considered her panic room to be a spare bedroom, although she has been receiving discretionary housing payment to cover the shortfall in her benefit.

She started High Court judicial review proceedings against the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) in May 2013, arguing that the bedroom tax is a discriminatory policy which will have severe consequences for her and her son.

In a judgement handed down on 29 January, which was summarised in a government bulletin on Wednesday, the court found in favour of the DWP.

The judge held that although the bedroom tax discriminates disproportionately against women, the policy has a ‘reasonable foundation’, according to the DWP bulletin summary.

A Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) survey in 2007 found that about half of England’s councils (171 of 354) were operating sanctuary schemes.

Figures obtained by a freedom of information (FOI) request to 79 councils in February last yearshow that since the bedroom tax was introduced in 2013, 281 households have been affected by the policy.

According to the summary, the judge commented that while it would have been helpful for parliament to have considered the effect of the policy on those living in sanctuary schemes, it was ‘not surprising that no reference was made given the relatively small numbers of people involved’.

Discretionary housing payments (DHPs) – funds to help claimants with their housing costs – are a ‘not irrational’ way to deal with issues arising from sanctuary schemes, it added.

The council – which is also unnamed – adapted Claimant A’s property because her life was deemed to be at risk from an ex-partner with a history of serious violence.

The home had a ‘panic space’ and a specialist ‘sanctuary system’ installed, which includes reinforced doors, electric alarms and alarms linked to the police station.

Claimant A has sought permission to appeal the decision to the Court of Appeal.

50:50 Equality Day Hustings Video and 16 April Meeting

  

NEW LOGO CROPPED 

50:50 Equality Day - If you missed the event you can see a film of the Hustings event in the afternoon. The audience was pleased to hear from 

representatives of 6 political parties what their parties would do for women if elected to government on 7th May.  The Parties were: the Conservatives, the Greens, Labour, Liberal Democrats, the Trades Union Social Coalition/Left Unity Party and UKIP. 


We gave the candidates three questions in advance - and filmed their three minute responses.
You can view these now and make your mind up on which party will serve women's interests best. The candidates were introduced by our Chair Yvonne Atkinson - their answers strictly timed thanks to Carol Steele and Yvonne.
How did each candidate do? Have you heard these three important issues addressed anywhere else?

 

 

Click link below to view on Or YouTube or on Vimeo

Equality Day

 

 

 

 

 

Next Meeting 16th April Torquay

 

Meeting will be at St Matthias’ Church Centre Babbacombe Road Torquay TQ1 1 HW Tel 01803 214175. Click for MapMeet at 6.15 pm for a social.  Forum kicks off  at 6.30 p.m. For a lift from Exeter email info@fawcett.org.uk to request a lift

 

      Draft Agenda
  • Feedback from the 50:50 event (including financial)
  • What can we do as a result of the event to take FD forward?
  • Report on Hustings film and what  has been done and what else  do we want to do with it?
  • What should we do with editing  the film of the rest of the event and interviews?
  • The future of FD in the light of discussions with Fawcett Society.
  • Preparation for  May AGM ; how do we communicate roles we want filled etc e.g. Co-oordinator, Treasurer; service contract with DCC on equality and diversity advice?  Do we want to seek roles elsewhere? How do we seek volunteers to come forward. What support will they be given? How will they report to the group? Who will do what to organise the AGM and write role descriptions?
  • Can we afford to, should we pay for a support person to support post holders?
  • Financial policy – where are we now on this and and the adoption of funding priorities/seeking applicants?
  • Request for funding from East Devon for restoration of portait of Juanita Maxwell Phillips
  • Emails what do we want to do re monitoring and sending emails after the AGM?
  • Help with communication (website and newsletter facebook twitter etc)
  • Programme of speakers and events for rest of the year
  • AOB
  • Location date and time of AGM 18th May 

                  JOIN THE FAWCETT SOCIETY TODAY 

 
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Young Women Need Action on Rape

The Need for Support Services for Young Women and Girls

In Devon and Torbay

 National Statistics

  • 18,915 recorded sexual offences against under 16s in 2012 (Police)
  • 36% of all rapes are committed against children under 16 (Home Office)
  • 72% of children do not tell anyone at the time of their abuse (Home Office)
  • A rise in the prosecution of child abuse images to 20,373 in 2012-13 (Police)
  • 1 in 3 girls experience unwanted sexual touching in school (YouGov/EVAW)
  • 1 in 3 teenage girls experience sexual violence from a partner (NSPCC)
  • 22% of women contacting Devon Rape Crisis Service are adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse
  • Age profile of service users of Devon Rape Crisis Service is greatest in 18-24 range

 Devon and Cornwall Police Data

October 2013- September 2014

  • 589 sexual offences reported by those aged 17 or under in Devon and Torbay
  • Estimated incidence of over 6,000 (British Crime Survey)

 Issues with the Current Provision in Devon and Torbay

  • Provision limited to certain groups
  • Direct support services are only available through agency referral
  • Direct support services limited to those who have reported or disclosed

 Implications for Young Women and Girls

No specialist service for young women and girls who

  • have not told anyone else
  • are too scared to disclose
  • fear a police intervention
  • want to explore their options for reporting
  • want an anonymous service
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